AANRO Current research projects – 2 retrieved

Economics of conservation through commercial use of wildlife: FATE Start and Finish Date: 200206 – 200704   ( Current project )

Prof M (Michael) Archer Ph: (02) 93206110 
mikea@austmus.gov.au
Australian Museum
College Street SYDNEY NSW 2000  
Objectives: The project will be conducted in two stages. An initial literature review and model development will enable a decision to be made on whether to progress to the monitoring of field trials and economic analyses of the commercial use of Australian native wildlife within the FATE Program over a five-year period.
The second stage if supported, will assess the prospective and actual economic effects of the integration of native wildlife enterprises into the operation of groups of existing grazing properties, mainly in the marginal rangelands of New South Wales. It will monitor the economic dimensions of three to five Wildlife Management Conservancies (trial sites each of several properties) incorporating wildlife tourism enterprises, the sale of bush plants and animals for conservation works, bush tucker production, in particular kangaroo products, and the production of ecosystem services. A series of reports will be produced, to assist participants in the planning and establishment of new enterprises, to assess the actual economic effects of these activities over the period, and to compare the profitability of conventional grazing systems in the case study regions with the profitability of the modified or mixed systems of land use

Progress: A literature review has been completed and is being updated. The idea of using native plant and animal species for private commercial gain is neither new nor unusual. The report of a recent inquiry by the Victorian Parliament contains an excellent review of the range of commercial uses to which native species have been and are being put. A farm-level economic model that allows ‘baseline’ and ‘prospective’ situations, capable of incorporating enterprises based on native plants or animals, has been obtained. It is capable of representing a wide range of production systems, multi-year operations, and the economic characteristics of the proposed Wildlife Management Conservancies. Work is now focussing on (i) the collection of information on farm level costs, returns and production methods for enterprises based on native species, including a kangaroo enterprise; and (ii) the preparation of a discussion paper on the ways in which the returns to farmers from the production of native species depend on the structure of the value (marketing) chain

Sponsors: RIRDC: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Information supplied by Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation on December 2003. This project is part of the Resilient Agricultural Systems research program. [ project code: RIRDC MUA1A ]

Record number: RIRDC2006

 

Environmental management system for trout production in inland saline water

Start and Finish Date: 200106 – 200406   ( Completed project )

Dr A (Alan) Lymbery Ph: (08) 93602729 
alymbery@central.murdoch.edu.au
Murdoch University
Division of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences Murdoch WA 6150  
Objectives: To increase environmental and economic sustainability of rainbow trout production in inland saline water by developing an environmental management system (EMS) for fish production and designing a marketing strategy to capitalise on consumer preference for quality food produced in an environmentally friendly way

Progress: The effluent from four different trout production systems was sampled over a 12-month period and analysed for water quality. There were significant loadings of total nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate/nitrite, total phosphorous and salinity in the effluent from all systems. The load of nutrients and salt discharged from trout farms may potentially impact on downstream riverine communities. A simulation model of nutrient cycling in inland saline trout ponds has been developed and is being used in conjunction with the water quality data to evaluate the environmental risks from trout farm effluent. A literature review of mitigation techniques for nutrient and salt discharge has been conducted, and constructed wetlands were identified as a sustainable, cost-effective method of reducing nutrient and salt loads in effluent. Experimental wetlands have been constructed using different plant species and are currently being tested for their efficiency in nutrient and salt removal under different conditions. A survey of inland saltwater trout consumers was conducted to test responses to environmental management and product quality information. Although the overwhelming majority of consumers recognised the importance of sustainable production, their willingness to pay more for products purely because they are produced in accordance with an environmental management system was less obvious. A more detailed consumer survey is currently being prepared.

Sponsors: RIRDC: Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation

Information supplied by Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation on December 2003. This project is part of the Resilient Agricultural Systems research program. [ project code: RIRDC UMU27A ]

Record number: RIRDC2016